An Módh Scoil, Corcaigh

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An Módh Scoil, or The Model School on Anglesea Street, Cork was a primary school built in 1865 and operated until the early 1990’s when it was converted to a district court. I went there as a child so it’s wonderful to see this photo of the classroom.

Thanks usedtobe.ie for the photos here and here.

CORK DISTRICT MODEL SCHOOLS

THE Irish Board of National Education has caused a Model School for the Cork district to be established in that city. The situation, in Anglesea. street, is convenient and accessible from all parts. The building, shown in one of our illustrations, was commenced in January, 1864, and finished this summer. The architect was Mr. J. H. Owen, and the work, according to his designs, was done by Mr. James Delvin, the contractor; Mr. P. Lynch being clerk of the works. The style of architecture is Italian, the materials are red and black bricks, with Portland stone dressings and sculptured capitals and limestone columns. The interior is divided into three compartments—namely, male, female, and infant schools-which are distinctly separated from each other. The entire length of the front line of the building is 291 ft., exclusive of yards or railings. A tower 60 ft. high rises in the centre, the upper story of which is intended as an observatory for the advanced classes of the male department. The boys’ school is 60 ft. long by 30 ft. wide; the girls’, 40 ft. by 30 ft. There is a maritime school, 40 ft. by 25 ft., with four class-rooms attached, with lavatory, caproom, and coatroom. The infants’ school is 48 ft. long by 25 ft. wide, with one class-room, lavatory, cloak and bonnet room. To each school-room are attached large, airy sheds, with spacious playgrounds and every necessary accommodation.

[Taken from Illustrated London News, Vol. XLVII, 1865, p.180]

Béal na Bláth Ambush Site

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In 1922 at Béal na Bláth in Co Cork, a convoy carrying Michael Collins, commander of the national army was ambushed by anti-treaty forces.

From the Wikipedia page:

On 22 August 1922, during the Irish Civil War, Michael Collins, Chairman of the Provisional Government and Commander-in-chief of the National Army, was killed in an ambush here by the Ryan Agents of Holycross anti-treaty IRA forces while travelling in convoy from Bandon. The ambush was planned in a farmhouse in Béal na Bláth close to The Diamond Bar.[2] Commemorations are held on the nearest Sunday to the anniversary of his death. A memorial cross (coordinates 51.81356°N 8.85651°W) stands at the site of the shooting on a local road 1 km south of the village which was a dirt road when Collins was shot. A small white cross marks the spot where he fell.

You can read more about his final journey here where I found the b/w photo of the officers at the the site.

The colourised photo was posted on Facebook a few days ago.

Union Quay, Cork

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Union Quay, Cork sometime between 1900 and 1920 as posted here.

Cork College of Commerce would be built out of shot on the left bank while directly ahead is the School of Music. Is that building at the end of the left bank the old Suttons building?

Before Bishop Lucey Park

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Bishop Lucey Park on the Grand Parade was a car park before. I have to admit I have no memory of this at all. Even though I always think of Bishop Lucey Park as “new” it was actually opened in 1985!

Photo by Pat Galvin, posted here where he says,

Pre Bishop Lucey Park. This was taken around the same time as Tony’s photo of the Grand Parade. We had a radio Station “Leeside” on the top floor of the Shamrock shop. There was a 12″ drop from one side of the room to the other, so rent was cheap.